Last edited by Nikree
Saturday, July 11, 2020 | History

2 edition of John Ericsson and the age of caloric found in the catalog.

John Ericsson and the age of caloric

Eugene S. Ferguson

John Ericsson and the age of caloric

by Eugene S. Ferguson

  • 61 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by U.S. G.P.O. in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ericsson, John, -- 1803-1889.,
  • Caloric engines.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementEugene S. Ferguson.
    SeriesContributions from the Museum of History and Technology -- paper 20, United States National Museum bulletin -- 228., Bulletin (United States National Museum) -- no. 228.
    The Physical Object
    PaginationP. 42-59 :
    Number of Pages59
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19746119M

    The Man Who Made the Monitor. A Biography of John Ericsson, Naval Engineer $ In stock. Ericsson then proceeded to invent independently the caloric, or hot air engine in the 's which used hot air, caloric, in the scientific parlance of the day, instead of steam as a propellant. A similar device had been patented in by the Reverend Robert Stirling, whose technical priority of invention provides the usual term 'Stirling.

    31 Jul - short biography, births, deaths and events on date of Ericsson's birth. John Dahlgren - quotes about the U.S.S. Monitor, which used the cannon he designed. Man of the Monitor, The Story of John Ericsson, by Jean Lee Latham. - book suggestion. John Ericsson invented the ship propeller and incorporated the landmark device into his design for the Civil War ironclad the Monitor. Born in the Swedish province of Vermland, Ericsson first worked helping plan a Swedish canal. While working on the canal, he was tutored in math and the sciences.

    In Ericsson unveiled another stunning new design, a “caloric” engine that ran on hot air rather than steam. In the New York Tribune, Horace Greeley, always ready to cheer the new, wrote that “the age of steam is closed, the age of caloric opens. Fulton and Watt belong to the past.   The ship, called the Ericcson, was the invention of John Ericsson, a Swedish-American engineer best known for having built the Federal ironclad Monitor, whose Civil War battle with the Virginia in.


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John Ericsson and the age of caloric by Eugene S. Ferguson Download PDF EPUB FB2

John Ericsson (born Johan Ericsson; J – March 8, ) was a Swedish-American inventor. He was active in England and the United States.

Ericsson collaborated on the design of the railroad steam locomotive Novelty, which competed in the Rainhill Trials on the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, which were won by inventor George Stephenson's (), : Johan Ericsson, JLångbanshyttan.

John Ericsson and the age of caloric. Washington, Smithsonian Institution, (OCoLC) Named Person: John Ericsson; John Ericsson: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Eugene S Ferguson.

John Ericsson and the Age of Caloric Eugene S Ferguson Washington. U.S.S Monitor. The Ship That Launched A Modern Navy Edward M Miller Annapolis, ISBN The Man who made the Monitor.

A Biography of John Ericsson, Naval Engineer. Olav Thulesius The following books are in the Swedish language: John Ericsson. John Ericsson, (born JLångbanshyttan, Swed.—died March 8,New York, N.Y., U.S.), Swedish-born American naval engineer and inventor who built the first armoured turret warship and developed the screw propeller.

After serving in the Swedish army as a topographical surveyor, Ericsson went to London in and constructed a steam locomotive, the Novelty, for a.

Ericsson's chief American supporter was New York merchant John B. Kitching (), who may have been the recipient of this letter and was an agent for the sale of the caloric engines.

Another possible recipient is industrialist Cornelius H. DeLamater (), who allowed Ericsson to experiment at his ironworks, where Ericsson's caloric.

LIEUTENANT JOHN ERICSSON JEMTLAND FIELD CHASSEURS. ERICSSON AT THE AGE OF TWENTYONE. CHAPTER III. THE FIRST STEAM FIRE ENGINE able adopted American appear applied attention authority battery British build built called caloric canal Captain Captain Ericsson carried claim complete concerning confidence construction.

Ericsson’s chief American supporter was New York merchant John B. Kitching (), who may have been the recipient of this letter and was an agent for the sale of the caloric engines. Another possible recipient is industrialist Cornelius H.

DeLamater (), who allowed Ericsson to experiment at his ironworks, where Ericsson’s. Moving to New York inhe soon teamed up with Harry Cornelius Delameter of the Phoenix foundry, a partnership which resulted in Ericsson's most famous work, the USS Monitor.

Focusing on the man behind the inventions, this book tells the life story of John Ericsson.4/5(1). John Ericsson and the Age of Caloric Eugene S Ferguson Washington. John Ericsson. Mannen och uppfinnaren Carola Goldkuht Stockholm. U.S.S Monitor.

The Ship That Launched A Modern Navy Edward M Miller Annapolis, ISBN ; The following books are non technical biographies. 40 From the Boston evening transcript, reported in ‘The caloric ship “Ericsson”’, Mechanics' magazine, Iviii (), For an excellent study of the Ericsson engines, see Ferguson, E., ‘ John Ericsson and the age of caloric ’, Contributions from the Museum of History and Technology, Bulletin (), pp.

42 – When told that the name of his friend and associate in the caloric enterprise, Mr. John B. Kitching, stood very low in Lombard Street in consequence of his connection with this invention, Ericsson indignantly replied that the caloric was. a boon to humanity, and was another step in the progress of.

Von Platen was disappointed when John decided to join the army. His drawing skill was recognized and got him promoted. In the s, Ericsson invented a caloric or hot air engine thought to be more efficient than steam. He relocated to London inand resigned his army position to pursue s: 1.

PART SEVEN: John Ericsson and Open Cycle Engines. Ericsson's Caloric Engines--Flame engine; patent; letter to the I.C.E; method of raising steam; Rainhill locomotive trials; engine; engine; engine; patent; The Caloric ship "Ericsson" patent; patent; Engine; patent; patent; T.

Via; Tom Thumb. Captain John Ericsson, -was born in the province of Wermland, Sweden. The golden age of the American merchant marine was the period of the sailing ship.

John Ericsson and the age of caloric by Eugene S Ferguson (Book) Annals of the Swedes on the Delaware by Jehu Curtis Clay (Book) Captain John Ericsson: father of the "Monitor" by Constance Buel Burnett (Book).

John Ericsson became intrigued with the idea of a caloric engine at a young age. The caloric engine worked on the basic principle of power by hot air, with no need for steam.

Expanding warm air drove the piston, fly wheel, and shaft. Ericsson began designing caloric engines in the s and continued to modify the designs until his death. 2 DESCRIPTIVE SUMMARY Repository: The Mariners' Museum Library Title: John Ericsson Letter on Caloric Engines Inclusive Dates: January 25 Catalog number: MS Physical Characteristics: 1 letter (correspondence) Language: English Creator: Ericsson, John, BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH John Ericsson was born in the province of Vermland, Sweden, on J Captain John Ericsson Father of the Monitor [Burnett, Constance Buel] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Captain John Ericsson Father of the Monitor. Early career. John's and Nils's father Olaf Ericsson who worked as the supervisor for a mine in Värmland had lost money in speculations and had to move his family from Värmland to Forsvik in There he worked as a 'director of blastings' during the excavation of the Swedish Göta extraordinary skills of the two brothers were discovered by Baltzar von Platen, the architect of.

John Ericsson. Built the ironclad USS Monitor. Birthplace: Langbanshyttan, Wermland, Sweden Location of death: New York City Cause of death: unspecified Remains: Buried, Östra. Military service: Swedish Army () Swedish-American naval engineer, born at Langbanshyttan, Wermland, Sweden, on the 31st of July He was the second son of Olaf Born:.

Published in by Silver Burdett Press pages of text. 8 pages of timelines, sources and an index at the end. This book is part of a larger series (The History of the Civil War Series).It is very readable with a good balance of national history versus the biography of Swedish immigrant inventor John Ericsson, with the glaring exception I note below.3/5(1).English: Caloric Ship Ericsson, burthen tons, Built for John B Kitching & Associates, A B Lowber, Commander Print.

The Ericsson was built to test Captain John Ericsson’s theory of a ship driven by hot air instead of steam. The idea proved a failure and she was given an ordinary steam engine.John Ericsson (J – March 8, ) was an American Swedish-born inventor and mechanical engineer, as was his brother, Nils Ericson.

He was born at Långbanshyttan in Värmland, Sweden, but primarily came to be active in the United States. Contents[show] Early career John's and Nils's father Olaf Ericsson who worked as the supervisor for a mine in Värmland had lost money in.